Metaphors analysis in sylvia plaths poem

Check new design of our homepage! A Literary Analysis of the Undertones of Sylvia Plath's 'Metaphors' For those of you who love poetry or for those who need to learn and understand it, Sylvia Plath raises the bar. Quite difficult to understand, her poems are equally interesting to analyze. Penlighten Staff Last Updated:

Metaphors analysis in sylvia plaths poem

In this article, I will examine Metaphors by Sylvia Plath. This poem is about pregnancy. It examines the aesthetics, effects, and implications of motherhood. On close examination, it implies that Plath was at least somewhat ambivalent about giving birth.

Metaphors Analysis Line One: Playfully, the reader is informed that the speaker Plath is a riddle. The poet challenges her readers to find the correct answer.

Sylvia Plath and Stings

The first line offers at least two clues. First, is the reference to the number of syllables. Looking closely, the first line does in fact contain nine syllables each line does in fact.

Second is the number nine itself as pregnancy is typically expected to last nine months. The two images, of an elephant and a ponderous house, contained in the second line of Metaphors both refer to form. Elephants live in herds of mothers and children, led by an older matron.

Male elephants are driven away at adulthood and live largely solitary existences, save for mating. The allusion to pregnancy is more obvious here pregnant woman could reasonably be said to house her child, after all.

A melon strolling on two tendrils. Here the imagery is slightly more comical, as Plath calls to mind an overripe piece of fruit meandering down the street on leg-like vines. Again, this line is drawing attention to the aesthetics of pregnancy.

The swollen belly becomes an oversized melon, with slender, twig like legs holding up the added baby weight.

Sylvia Plath and Metaphors

On a deeper level, fruit is the by-product of reproduction. The tree is pollinated; its buds swell into juicy fruit, full of its young, in the form of seeds.

O red fruit, ivory, fine timbers! Here the metaphor from the previous line is continued and expanded on. The poet was known, in part, for being beautiful, after all. Perhaps the poet felt like the trunk of a tree weighed down with fruit.

In line 5, Plath refers to herself to a loaf of bread, growing larger by the moment. This metaphor is particularly apt for a couple of reasons. First, like bread, pregnant women, and their fetuses, undergo a number of changes.

They grow, change shape, and become more complex on a cellular level. The second reason this is an appropriate metaphor is the yeast.

Metaphors analysis in sylvia plaths poem

An integral part of the bread making process, yeast is, in fact, alive. It is a living thing suspended inside the bread making it grow, transforming it from the inside out, just as a woman is transformed by the life growing inside of her. Or did she fear that the child would be exploited somehow?

The poet begins to explore some her more ambivalent feelings toward pregnancy in this line. This line implies a couple of things. First, that Plath feels used.

Perhaps she feels that the baby was not her idea, that she was forced into pregnancy situation somehow. It could also be that the feels used by her unborn child itself. What is the destiny of a calf? At worst, they are eaten. In line 8, Plath describes herself as being full of fruit, possibly unripe fruit.

Anyone who ate a bag full of apples would undoubtedly find themselves bloated and uncomfortable.- Metaphors Analysis in Sylvia Plath's Poem In Sylvia Plath’s poem, Metaphors, she uses striking imagery to explore her ambivalent attitudes about pregnancy.

For example, she uses a negative metaphor saying she is an elephant, meaning she thinks that she has become very fat since she got pregnant. Stings is one of five special poems Sylvia Plath wrote in October , at a time of great emotional turmoil for the poet and mother of two. The five poems, known collectively as the Bee Sequence, comprise The Bee Meeting, The Arrival of the Bee Box, Stings, The Swarm and Wintering.

Sylvia Plath loves making her readers work. This poem is a prime example, as it's through and through a poem of metaphors and riddles. When you read Plath, you might find yourself stopping again an. Sylvia Plath was an American poet, novelist, and short-story writer.

She was the first poet to receive a Pulitzer Prize posthumously for her Collected Poems (Harper & Row, ) in 16 Responses to “Metaphors” by Sylvia Plath. Feb 07,  · A year later Sylvia Plath was dead, having written some of her best poems during this turbulent period.

In this article you'll find a stanza by stanza analysis of the poem, a video with Sylvia Plath reading her poem, the whole poem, and other relevant information suitable for both student and interested leslutinsduphoenix.coms: Metaphors Analysis in Sylvia Plath's Poem In Sylvia Plath’s poem, Metaphors, she uses striking imagery to explore her ambivalent attitudes about pregnancy.

For example, she uses a negative metaphor saying she is an elephant, meaning she thinks that she has become very fat since she got pregnant.

A Literary Analysis of the Undertones of Sylvia Plath's 'Metaphors'